Keeper of His Home

by Chelsea McCafferty

Where Did “Holy Matrimony” Originate?

medium_3641641090
Kamal Zharif via photopin cc

Holy Matrimony. Where did the concept originate? What does it mean to be joined together in holy matrimony and how has the concept evolved? How does it affect marrying couples of today? These are the questions I had in mind as I read about the history of marriage in and outwith the church. The first issue we need to explore is the idea of being “joined together” and who has the right to do this “joining” of a man and a woman.

You may be surprised to discover that marriage was not always a matter of state or government. The government didn’t always have a say in whether or not a couple was joined together in marriage. Couples didn’t always require a state license to wed, nor be married by a person who was government-certified to do so. It wasn’t until the middle ages that marriage contracts permitted by the church or the state came into being. In fact, it may surprise you even more to learn that the church really had little to do with the contractual joining of a couple in matrimony for nearly 6,000 years.

Prior to the middle ages, a man and a woman were joined in marriage by vows that they took and pledged before God and private contracts between families. There need by no officiate present. No one did the “joining” except for the One who actually created marriage in the first place – God. A marriage declared by a couple and their family was considered valid and recognized up through the 1700’s.

 

“So they are no longer two but one flesh. What therefore God has joined together, let not man separate.” Matthew 19:6

 

God is the Author of marriage and He joins a man and a woman in matrimony. He brings them together. He hears and receives the vows they present to one another and to Him. He blesses their union and gives them instruction through His Word as to how their marriages should work. This is how both the early church and early government saw the marriage covenant. Then, between the 17th and 18th centuries it all started to change.

As we have watched and experienced, various governments have grown in their roles and scope of authority over the years. In the history of America, and other countries as well, mankind has fought against unjust and bad governments. We have submitted to governments that seem to be more just and right. We have allowed them to take control of some aspects of our lives, and have pushed back against them when they have tried to go too far. We apply for driver’s licenses thereby asking the government for permission to drive and recognizing their authority. We offer up our taxes and fees. We pay for licenses to run businesses, keep dogs and to hold yard sales on our property. We ask their permission to enter into marriage by applying for a license, and we are “joined together” by a person who has asked for permission to do so by applying for a license himself. It wasn’t always like this, but that’s the way it is today. The government has seized control of God’s beautiful creation of marriage and therefore now assumes the authority to determine and change the very concept of marriage….one man and one woman.

We can expect nothing less. When we let the world in, it will twist and turn and re-invent what God did perfectly the first time. He formed the man and the woman to be perfect counterparts for each other, physically, spiritually and emotionally. He brought the woman to the man and joined them together in a truly holy matrimony. He declared that none should separate them. He desired that their covenant would be kept sacred and unbreakable. There were no officiates or state contracts involved. It was pure and it was exquisite.

As I write this, I find myself a little saddened by the way the secular world has worked its way into this sacred covenant. On the other hand, a marriage is still a very beautiful occasion, and there is nothing wrong with a couple submitting to government ordinances in purchasing a marriage license, throwing a big celebration and allowing someone to officiate by leading them through their vows and wedding traditions. As long as a couple understands that it truly is God who is “joining” them in marriage, the rest is just fun and romantic. We just need to remember to keep Jesus at the center of our wedding ceremonies and to make it very clear that it is God who does the joining.

Leave a comment »

Part 9 – Love Thinks No Evil, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“….Love thinks no evil.” 1 Corinthians 13:5

What does it mean to think evil? In this world we temporarily dwell in we are surrounded by evil. It’s on the television, in the newspapers and magazines, in the streets—everywhere. It’s so easy for us to get desensitized to what is evil because we see a world full of people accepting and even glorying in evil. So when God says that love doesn’t think evil, what does He mean and how can it be accomplished?

Let’s get back to the language. The Greek word for “think” is “logizomai“, and it can be translated to: “reckon, count, compute, calculate, to take into account, to number among, to consider, weigh, meditate on, to determine, purpose, to decide.” So this word is more about how we weigh something up in our minds. What do I determine about this person or issue? What is their substance? How have I judged or calculated their motives to be? It is actually less about what the subject actually is and more about how we’ve labeled it.

Now the word for “evil” is the Greek word “kakos” and means “of a bad nature, of a mode of thinking, feeling and acting base, wrong, wicked, troublesome, injurious, pernicious, destructive, and baneful.”

What’s fascinating about taking this phrase apart is that by understanding the text we get a better idea about the point God is making here. You see it’s not about whether or not a person is evil or has a bad nature. It’s not about whether or not they truly are being troublesome or wicked or if they secretly despise you. It’s not really about them at all. When God said “love thinks no evil”, it’s about me. It’s about how I view people and how I love them. It’s about not being cynical and looking for the worst in people. It’s about not labeling someone as evil, wicked, troublesome or destructive, especially when I don’t know that it’s true.

I think about a juror in a court room. They are presented the facts and are told to make a judgement based on those facts determining whether or not the defendant is guilty. They may be looking at a pile of evidence but it all comes down to how concrete they determine that evidence to be. God is reminding us here that we aren’t the judge and we aren’t in a courtroom. We are supposed to be loving people, not determining how wicked they are or labeling them as evil. Now, there may be evil in their lives. They may be guilty of all of the bad things you suspect. They may be out to get you or they may really be giving you dirty looks behind your back. That’s not the point. The point is how are you going to think on that person. You can choose to think no evil by taking those thoughts captive. You can choose to love people, whether or not they love you. If we really want to be effective in leading others to Christ, we need to show them this kind of love.

I think about a time when a young man came to our old church for a while. The church was something of a legalistic church, and the people weren’t very graceful to say the least. Regardless, I remember this young man entered the church and he was wearing torn up, un-matching clothes, dog chains and a bright green mohawk. He had several tattoos and piercings. The young man attended the church for a while off and on. I’ll never forget when one of the ladies from the church (in her sunday best looking prim and proper) walked up the young man and said she had to confess to him that she had secretly been judging him by the way he looked ever since he started attending.

For one thing, I couldn’t believe this woman’s discernment that the best way to deal with HER inward sin was to confess it to the person who didn’t even know how much she had been despising him. She unburdened herself at his expense when she could have simply confessed and repented to the Lord and spared him the embarrassment. Still, this woman’s heart was to think evil. She had judged him. She had labeled him. She had determined he was wicked and evil. And even when she did confess of this sin, her unloving attitude had driven the young man away from God and not to Him. How sad. Let us not be this kind of person. Let us love people and think no evil.

God says we can take every thought captive that goes against His Word. He also says in Philippians 4 that we are to think on what is true and of good report. We aren’t to go passing judgements or labeling or determining the heart of another person. We aren’t called to do that. We are called to love. Love.

Leave a comment »

Part 8 – Love is not Easily Provoked, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“Love is not easily provoked.” 1 Corinthians 13:5

I have found that there are times in my life when exhibiting the love of God—His way—means going against my very nature. See I’m a sinner. I’m selfish my nature. In my selfishness, I tend to be impatient and ungraceful. I tend to be easily provoked to anger when things do not go my way or when people (even the little ones) do not do as I ask, exactly how I asked and at the very moment I asked.

Excellent recent example. Last night I was holding my three year-old daughter and she was munching on some candy. It was “Nerds” candy, which are like tiny colorful pebbles. She kept shaking the box and I told her that she would likely spill them if she continued to shake the box. So she stopped. Wait…no….that’s not how it went! Of course my strong-willed little girl didn’t stop. She continued to shake the box and suddenly sent the candy flying all over me! If I was a cartoon character you would have seen my eyes turn red and smoke come out of my ears. I sharply rebuked her for not listening and making a mess.

After some kind words of encouragement from my own mother (who had seen the whole thing), I realized I had over-reacted. I had been easily provoked to anger. My daughter had not understood the consequences of what she was doing. I had not given her a direct order to stop shaking the box, but rather suggested it was a bad idea. She didn’t listen. Instead she continued to learn how her bad judgement had caused the candy to be sucked up the vacuum instead of her mouth! Love is not easily provoked.

How often do we do this very thing to God. We go against the Spirit’s conviction in our hearts to do something we know isn’t good for us. Sometimes God has said no. Sometimes He’s just said it isn’t a good idea. Sometimes we listen and sometimes we don’t. The good news is, when we don’t listen and we follow our own desires or way of thinking rather than God’s, and we stumble and fall, God is not quick to anger. He is not easily provoked. When we mess up and sin and come running to Him for forgiveness, He doesn’t shout out us or give us the cold shoulder. He is not easily provoked. His love is longsuffering and patient.

I long to be a mother and wife who is not easily provoked. I pray that God will chip away that quick temper that is part of my nature. I hope one day to be the kind of woman that people look at and wonder, “does she ever get angry?” hehe It won’t be soon but maybe someday with the help of the Holy Spirit!

God’s love is not easily provoked. Are you easily provoked to anger or wrath? Do you have patience and grace for people? Are you slow to anger and quick to forgive? We all need to pray for God to perfect His love in us so that we can pour that love out on our family, our friends, our church family and the lost. May His love be ever in our hearts and on our tongues!

Leave a comment »

Part 7 – Love Does not Seek Its Own, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“…love does not seek its own..” 1 Corinthians 13:5

What does it mean to “seek ones own” in terms of love? It’s an interesting phrase and also interesting that most of the various translations have it the same way. Some add that love does not “seek its own things” and another shortens it to being “self-seeking”. The NLT says love “does not demand its own way”. When it comes down to it, what the Lord is basically saying is that His kind of love—the real kind—is not selfish, self-seeking, self-focused and self-pleasing. Self, self, self!

It’s not difficult at all to get caught up in self in the world we live in today. Every magazine, therapist and politician we see and hear proclaim that we need to take care of ourselves first and foremost. I cringe to think of a Christian sister going to the world for counsel because she will be bombarded with messages of self-love, self-focus and self-gratification. She is told that she needs to care for herself first before looking to meet anyone else’s needs. She will be told to search within herself for the answers instead of searching out the Word of God and His heart. She is told to neglect her family in order to seek out her own way in life. She is told if she doesn’t like her husband she should leave and follow her dreams. Who cares about her husband and children? They can take care of themselves, right?

I think that most of the reasons people have for getting divorced today boils down to this very important point—this point which has been lost in a social sea of self-seeking corruption. It all comes down to seeking one’s own instead of others. Love does not seek its own. If more people understood this there would be so fewer divorces and strained marriages. Love does not seek its own! Its so simple and yet so corrupted by the wickedness of this world!

Sisters, do not be deceived. God has not called us to be self-seekers but self-sacrificers! God has not called us to be self-gratifiers but selfless servants. God has not called us to be self-focused but to be self-abandoners so that we may truly be lovers of the hearts of our husbands, children, family and friends. We were not created to be selfish beings. We don’t need more self-esteem, we need more God-esteem. We need to take our eyes off of ourselves and put them directly on Jesus Christ.

I have known many women who have suffered with depression and anxiety. I myself battled with it at times in my life and I can tell you from experience that those times when I have been most depressed and most anxious were the same times that I was taking my eyes off of the Lord and putting them on my self. Self-focus causes sin. It causes pride, bitterness, self-love, arrogance, depression, anxiety, self-harm—the truth is it is toxic to the heart of a believer. We need to stop looking at the mirror and start looking to the sky and to our Creator for fulfillment, happiness, joy and love. He is the source. There is nothing good within us and everything good in Him.

Love does not seek its own. Love does not seek itself or demand its own way. Love is giving. Love is selfless. Love is self-sacrificing and humble. Oh Lord, let us keep our eyes fixed firmly on You and let us abandon ourselves so that we can be perfected in Your love!

Leave a comment »

Part 6 – Love is not Rude, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“Love does not behave rudely…” 1 Corinthians 13:5

The Greek word for “behaving rudely” can also be translated to “behave itself unbecomingly” and isn’t it interesting that a person who puts on an air of rudeness often loses beauty in our estimation? I can see a beautiful woman walking across the room and think, “wow she is a stunning woman.” Then when I go to say hello she snubs me and looks at me like I just stepped off of an alien spacecraft. Suddenly this beauty has lost her shine and appeal. To think I might have looked up to her for her outward appearance, but now I wouldn’t even want to be in her presence.

That’s what rude behavior does to us ladies. It strips us of our beauty, shine and warmth and makes us into nasty creatures. That should be the last thing we want. I know what I want most is for my husband and daughter to look at me as if I am the most wonderful, special and loving person in the world. I don’t want them to see me as rude and obnoxious. I don’t want my Christian sisters and friends to think of me a as a rude person they have to put up with, but rather a woman who exhibits the love of Christ. We should desire to be beautiful, but not as the world sees. We should seek to exhibit the kind of beauty that God’s finds spectacular—a woman who fears the Lord and loves her family.

As a homekeeper, it is so very easy to slip into rude behavior behind closed doors. Sure, we can clean up nicely when we are out with our family at church or in town. We smile. We bridle our tongues and hold back the urge to make rude remarks. We are constrained by the desire to “look good” and that keeps us from rude behavior when eyes are upon us. The question is, what happens when the spectators are gone? Are we as kind, gently and compassionate to our own family?

We keepers of the home often get somewhat run-down by hectic schedules, long chore lists and the ever-present need to be on top of everything. Sometimes with this exhaustion comes a sort of laziness with how we treat our husband and kids at home. We are more comfortable to unwind and say whatever we like. We don’t feel the need to impress them so we struggle with nagging, unedifying speech and impatience. We need to remember that behaving in a way that is unbecoming is just as bad when its towards our family members in private. When I flippantly shout at my husband to get his own dinner and then start chowing down before he has time to join me, that’s rude. When I ignore my daughter’s questions (even when I’m not actively engaged in other activities or conversations) that’s rude. When I nag and whine and complain, that is very unbecoming.

Lord, help us to be women who are beautiful by Your standard and not women who behave rudely. Love is not rude. Love is compassionate, caring, edifying, humble and kind. We are learning so much about what love is and what it isn’t. I find it so very moving how it all can apply directly and in a special way for homekeepers.

Leave a comment »

Part 5 – Love is not Puffed Up, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“Love is not puffed up.” 1 Corinthians 13:4

Love is not puffed up with pride. It does not inflate itself or cause itself to swell in its own estimation. Love, in fact, is cloaked in humility. Sometimes the only way we can show love to our families and friends is through acts of humility. Yet I find this is an area of great struggle for myself and many other ladies.

When my husband and I first got married, we really knew very little about one another and our daily habits. There was a lot of compromising together and getting used to one another in that first couple of years. It was not always easy. Funny how the little things can add up and create conflict. One of those little things that caused problems on several occasions was clothing. My husband and I have very different tastes in clothing. He is much more easy going about what he would wear out into public, where I am more careful about wanting to wear something that best suits me.

Most of the time my husband picks out clothes that are perfectly fine and look good, but every once in a while there would be a bad one. It would always go the same way. Dear husband would come out of the room wearing something that I felt didn’t match, or was too tight or just wasn’t right for the occasion. I would say something to the effect of, “you’re not wearing that out are you?” His countenance would immediately change to one of frustration as he replied, “I’m a grown man. I can pick out my own clothes, thank you!”

Now whether or not I was right about the fashion choice, it was clear that this was going to be an ongoing conflict. My husband didn’t like being mothered and second-guessed by me, and I was worried that he would go out looking bad. We had a problem. After much prayer about this issue that kept popping up, the Lord spoke to my heart and basically asked me this, “What’s more important—that your he looks good or that their is peace between you?”

I realized what God wanted me to do. I had to let go of my pride. I had to stop worrying about what other people thought about my husband’s attire and instead choose to be okay with it. Love chooses humility. Love does not demand to be the center of attention. It builds up others, not self.

As keepers of the home, we have daily opportunities to love selflessly and in humility. When we find ourselves being too proud, or puffed up in our own minds, we need to remember our Savior Jesus who made Himself of no reputation but took on the form of a servant and died a sinner’s death for us. We need to see Him washing the feet of the disciples. As we serve, may our hearts mimic His and our love be His love flowing out of us.

Love is not puffed up. It’s not proud but perfect in humility. It is not inflated, but rather seeks to edify others and bless them. That’s the love every homekeeper must keep at the forefront of a long day’s work.

Leave a comment »

Part 4 – Love Does not Parade Itself, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“…love does not parade itself…” 1 Corinthians 13:4

This phrase “parade itself” is one of those translational difficulties that makes it difficult for us to truly grasp the concept here. The translation about is New King James Version. Let’s look at a few other translations:

“charity vaunteth not itself” KJV

“love does not brag” NASB

“love…is not boastful” NLT

Looking at the various translations gives us a better idea of what this phrase is saying. Love is not boastful, does not brag, does not parade itself as if on display or vaunt itself. Basically it is referring to a self-display or putting oneself on something of a pedestal. It reminds me of when Jesus spoke of the religious people and how they loved to stand in the streets praying loudly so that all could see them. They were not doing this to get closer to God or to draw others to Him. They were putting their religion on display so that others would see it and would consider them more spiritual. Perhaps they even wanted to inspire envy in others.

Love does not parade itself. True love, the kind that comes from God, is not motivated by what other people see. As a wife and mother, we are called to love our husband and children. We act out that love in a variety of ways: words, touch, acts of service, etc. We show our loved ones how much they mean to us in our actions and words, and it is that agape love that should motivate us to do this. Where we get into trouble is when we are not motivated by love but rather by how others view us.

I had a friend years back who seemed to always be putting on a show for the rest of us whenever we were together. She would go on and on about how wonderful her marriage was, how perfect her children were and how lovely life was in general. While we should all rejoice in the blessings God has given us, we do have to be careful that we are not doing the things we do or saying the things we say to put on a show for other people so we look better in their eyes. Our love should be our motivator, or it is simply not genuine.

Think of a parade. The participants sit on a float that’s all decorated fancy and wave and smile. Those big smiles say nothing about what’s really going on in their lives. It’s a show. It’s a spectacle. It’s not real life. Love is not a show or a parade. Love needs to be genuine and real. Love is not boastful so that others will envy our lives. Love is authentic.

We have all put on an act at one time or another in our lives. It’s hard sometimes to be real. As a homekeeper, we can have the picture perfect home, family and lives and still not have the genuine article. So let me not boast to the world of my perfect marriage, shockingly obedient child, spotlessly clean home, and unwavering, steadfast faith that I might be seen as some super-spiritual love guru. Instead let me embrace my husband, even when its been a long, tiring day. Let me remind him that I love him and will follow him after we’ve had a disagreement. Let me discipline my child for not obeying and then give her a long hug to assure her of my deep love for her. Let me serve my family by working hard to make a warm, happy home for them and show hospitality even when it’s not in perfect order.

Love does not parade itself. Real love is not about impressing other people. It’s about what how you love behind closed doors, on the bad days, when everything is not perfect, when trials come and obstacles arise. Love is about overcoming the challenges together. Love is about serving through good and bad weather. Sisters, don’t let your love be just a show or a way to boast. Instead, love in truth and may love always be your motivator for being the keeper of your home.

Leave a comment »

Part 3 – Love Does not Envy, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“Love does not envy.” 1 Corinthians 13:4

As I meditate on the concept of true, Godly love not be envious or jealous, and how that affects me personally as a keeper of the home, I find that it is quite relevant to my day to day life. In fact, jealousy and envy is one of the sins I struggle with more often. Studying the word’s origins is quite revealing. The word for “envy” is the Greek word “zēloō” which can be translated to “burn with zeal, to be heated, to boil with envy, hatred or anger, jealousy, to covet”. Interestingly, the same word can be used for a good type of zeal and can also be translated to mean “to be zealous in the pursuit of good, to desire one earnestly, to strive after one”.

When we think about pursuing someone with all your heart, the only One we should pursue with that intensity is Jesus Christ. At the same time, our amazing Savior is pursuing us and has a righteous jealousy towards us. That’s amazing and beautiful. What an honor to be pursued by the King of Kings! We can see that this word zēloō is to show us the type of zeal and burning we should have to follow after Christ with all that we have within us.

So how do we know when zēloō is righteous and when it is sin? Easy. The only zēloō that is good is when we are chasing after the Lord when we want more and more of Him and are never satisfied until we have all of Jesus in our lives. Chasing after anything other than the Lord with that heart becomes envy, jealousy, coveting, idolatry and sin. So here’s where we fall into danger.

I mentioned earlier that I struggled with envy. I certainly do. I envy women who I see as being more beautiful than myself. I sometimes struggled with envying others for their material possessions, their beautiful homes, their nice cars, their lack of struggles  to pay the bills each month. Being one that struggles with fertility issues, I have envied women who have been able to have babies easily. I admit that I have had to repent for envying women who seemed to have much better and easier lives than I. That envy, when left to rule our hearts, can turn to anger and hatred. It can cause us to burn on the inside and eats us alive. I’m ashamed that I have ever looked at a sister in the Lord and been so jealous of her that I burned with anger, but I have. I also have repented and am forgiven, praise Jesus!

Envy is not love and it does not produce love. Furthermore as a homekeeper, when I am envious of another woman’s home because it is beautiful, larger than mine, she has nice things, etc. I am being incredibly ungrateful for the home the Lord has given me and entrusted into my care. When we become ungrateful for what we have, we don’t care for what we have as we ought to. In other words, my lack of gratitude, brought on by envy, causes me to be a poorer homekeeper. When our eyes are always on the house across the street, we take our eyes off of our home and how we can make it special for our family. We may have not have the biggest or nicest house on the street, but we can make our home warm and joyful for our family and that’s what matters.

We must put off envy. We should not be chasing after material, earthly things, but sprinting towards Jesus all the time. Let us not be envy our sister’s home, possessions or even children, but let us be grateful for the family and home God has given us. Love does not envy. Let us love.

2 Comments »

Part 2 Love is Kind, The Loving Homekeeper Series

“…love is kind.” 1 Corinthian 13:4

Love is kind. The Greek word for “kind” is one that is not at all used often in the NT of the Bible. In fact, this verse in 1 Corinthians is the only time this word is used. It can be translated to “to show one’s self mild, to be kind, to use kindness.” I found it interesting that in God’s Word, which is filled to the brim and overflowing with verses about loving one another, showing grace and mercy, and carrying one another burdens, that this word for being kind is only used once.

In Ephesians 4:32 we see a different word for “kind” used. “And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” This word for “kind” is the same English word but in Greek means “fit for use, useful, virtuous, good, mild, pleasant and manageable.” Interestingly this word seems to be more about how a person behaves or how he or she is useful rather than their demeanor. In the OT we see the English word “kind” used a lot, but almost always it refers to God’s kindness and mercy. We do have one great example in Proverbs 31:26 of course.

“She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness.”

While they are not technically connected words, I think this example is the closest thing we see to the one in 1 Corinthians 13:4. This kindness that God speaks of isn’t necessarily about what we do for people, but rather our very heart towards them. As a keeper of the home, we do an awful lot for the ones we love. We cook, clean, sew, teach (the kids of course), encourage, plan, shop, budget…the list goes on and on. We do these things because we love God and we love our family. Sometimes I know I can get a bit worn out from the labor and the hard work. My spirit gets a bit deflated and I may start to lose that sweet demeanor that blesses my family.

I believe this is exactly where this “kindness” comes in. Love is kind. At the end of a long day, after cleaning the house and folding the laundry and giving baths and correcting homework and when I’m worn out and tired and exhausted and simply frazzled—am I kind? Is my love kind? When the running around stops and I’m just me with my family, am I kind? That’s where I feel the Lord encouraging me tonight. Homekeepers, we are busy ladies. There’s no doubt about it. We have a lot on our metaphorical plates and it seems we always have more items on our chore list than we have time for. When that quiet finally comes, even at our most exhausted moments, do we show our loved ones kindness?

After my daughter throws a temper tantrum and is punished, she will often come to me for a hug. While she is hurting, and hopefully regretting her actions, she still knows down deep that I love her so very much. Will I turn her away when she needs my affections, even when she’s been rude and sinful in her actions? No. I choose to show her kindness and mercy. She gets her punishment, but she will never reach the end of my kindness, nor my love. When my husband needs me to show him kindness, Lord may I be the one to do that with open arms and an encouraging smile. That’s God’s kind of love.

Love is kind. It’s a unique kindness that is part of our very nature when we have the love of God flowing through us. While we may not always feel like being kind, and we may even diminish that kindness in ourselves by being too bogged down by the cares of the world, may we submit our hearts to the Lord and show a sweet, warm kindness that heals and builds up our family and friends. God bless!

Leave a comment »

Part 1: Love is Patient,The Loving Homekeeper Series

“Love is patient…” 1 Corinthians 13:4

The Greek word for “patient” used in this passage is the word “makrothymeō“. This word can be translated into “long-suffering, to be of a long spirit, not to lose heart, to persevere with dignity through trials, to be patient in bearing others offenses, to be slow to anger and slow to punish.” There is quite a lot to this word. In no way does the English word “patient” do it justice.

I’ve never considered myself a naturally patient person. I tend to have a short fuse, especially when I am tired (which I’ve been since ever since I became a mom). My husband has seen the brunt of my bad temper far too often in our marriage and he has shown be grace when I certainly didn’t deserve it. My lot in life is to fight against the flesh that tempts me to be short tempered and to pray that God’s Spirit makes me long-suffering. I long to be patient with my husband, children, church family and friends, and all those I come into contact with.

As a Keeper of His Home, the calling to patience is so very important because we wives and mothers have to put up with and yet our family looks to us to be stability. No matter how much we love our precious little ones, they try our patience and boy do they pounce at any sign of weakness. My daughter is only three years old and she tests me on a daily basis. I must brush off her offenses, no matter how difficult, and provide her with clear, controlled and rational punishment and re-direction. I must not allow my anger to boil over and then to become a bad example instead of a good one. I have to make it clear that, while I do not like her behavior sometimes, I ALWAYS love my little girl.

My husband is a calm and steady kind of a guy. He is easy-going. He is laid back. He doesn’t understand how I can go from cold to hot and everywhere in between in a matter of seconds. God has called me to be the kind of wife that is patient with my husband. I do not expect him to do everything right all the time. I am not quick to jump on every mistake he makes or to correct every wrong detail when he’s telling a story to friends. I must be willing to let things slide as I know beyond a doubt he does for me when I’m in the wrong.

God calls us to be patient keepers of the home. How frustrating is it when our family members don’t clean up after themselves and leave messes for us? What about when we cook a decent dinner and do not receive even a small compliment? These things are frustrating when we are so busy trying to keep up our homes. Still, we must put on patience, because love is patient. Our love for our family should birth patience. If it doesn’t, we aren’t loving right.

Please Lord help us to be the patient and loving Homekeepers You desire us to be! Amen!

6 Comments »

Faithfully Fighting Lyme

Fighting Lyme Disease through the power of the living God

Faithful Lyme Warrior

Fighting Lyme Disease by the power of the Living God

easone13

A fine WordPress.com site

Kristeen Nicole Gillooly

Sharing the love of God through music. My voice, His message. Join the conversation.

Life Is A Beautiful Mess

A glimpse into the mess of life and the beauty of grace.

A Brunette's Reflection

Unprofessional Relationship Councilor, WannaBe World Traveler, Trial and Error Cook, and Almost Famous Whatchamacallit